Russian Security Strategy in Central Asia: On the Edge of No One’s Seat

CAISS Acting Director Anna Gussarova on Russian Security Strategy in Central Asia. Russian interests in Central Asia have consistently focused on security and economic cooperation within a number of multilateral institutions. With the withdrawal of U.S. forces from Afghanistan, efforts to counter violent extremism and drug trafficking have become the most important areas of interaction. Contemporary relations in Central Asia increasingly resemble classical game theory, specifically the prisoner’s dilemma and the Nash equilibrium. Even though it would be in their best interest to cooperate, the players choose not to and instead opt to maximize their individual gains. One clear example is the lack of cooperation among the Central Asian countries in their foreign and economic policies. Another is the stance of the Kremlin, which perceives itself as being involved in a zero-sum contest for regional influence with other external powers. As for the United States and the EU, their strategies in Central Asia have set other priorities and lie within strategic long-term programs. Facing competition among external actors and emerging challenges, Central Asian leaders and experts have formed certain attitudes toward their countries’ relations with Russia, sometimes referred to as “forced interdependence.” On the one hand, they criticize Russia’s foreign policy and global ambitions, even within intergovernmental bodies and organizations. On the other, they recognize that downgrading bilateral relations with Russia can harm their countries and citizens in important ways (including with regard to labor migration, dual citizenships, and water and energy resources, among other factors). As a result, Russia often plays leading roles in foreign and economic relations with Central Asia states, including as a source of remittances and as a rule-setter on trade. However, recent developments—including the economic crisis, the western sanctions on Russia over Ukraine, and the falling oil prices—have forced Central Asian countries to seek alternative solutions to contemporary challenges without openly confronting Moscow. At the same time, in Central Asia and in Kazakhstan in particular, Russia’s influence has been largely mythologized, and its role in both national and regional security has not been properly and honestly discussed. Different fears and phobias still influence the decision-making process, including those over Russia’s aggression in Ukraine, its annexation of Crimea, the concept of the “Russian World” as a pillar of its national identity, and its soft power. Meanwhile, the Kremlin itself seeks to combat myth-making and anti-Russian information campaigns in mass and social media, while stressing integration projects and cultivating its image abroad. Full memo can be

Read more

Central Asia risks greater exposure to Islamic extremism

CAISS Acting Director comments BNE Intellinews on violent extremism in Kazakhstan and Central Asia. “According to open sources, two years ago, [the number of radicalised] fighters was the largest in Tajikistan – 600 people, [followed by] 500 in Uzbekistan, 350 in Turkmenistan, 250 in Kazakhstan and around 100 in Kyrgyzstan,” the director of Central Asia at the Institute for Strategic Studies, Anna Gussarova, tells bne IntelliNews. Official figures are potentially skewed for most Central Asian countries, however, given that Uzbekistan’s government does not even disclose official figures. In Kazakhstan, for example, “400 people were charged with extremism and terrorism in 2015”, according to Gussarova, though only three of the cases have been tied to Syria, she notes. Most extremism in Central Asia does not express itself as IS or any other major terrorist movement activity. There are no large organised terrorist groups in the region, with the exception of the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU). Instead, the post-Soviet governments usually find themselves dealing with disparate cells of radicals. The rise of radical Islam in the region has most often been blamed on the regional economic crisis, as well as general poor socio-economic conditions for lower segments of society. However, Gussarova believes this explanation is too simple. “The problem runs much deeper and… cannot be calculated in economic terms,” Gussarova says, noting such factors as the number of internet users in each of the five countries, as the internet has grown to be one of the primary recruitment tools, as well as “traditionalist [cultural] value systems”, which may clash with those of the secular world, among multitudes of other causes. Gussarova believes the recruitment process is “deeply personal” for each recruit; as such, attempts to track any trends specific to the region may fall flat. Full

Read more

АКТУАЛЬНЫЕ ВОПРОСЫ МЕЖДУНАРОДНОЙ ПОЛИТИКИ КАЗАХСТАНА

Директор Центрально-Азиатского Института Стратегических исследований Анна Гусарова в эксклюзивном интервью по самым актуальным вопросам на сегодня, в мире и во внешней

Read more

“Détente in Small Steps – Towards a Stable Security Situation in Europe” (Vienna)

On March 7  CAISS Acting Director Anna Gussarova participated in a workhop “Détente in Small Steps – Towards a Stable

Read more

International Cooperation in Building Resilient Information Assurance: Best Practices

On March 1 to 3 CAISS Acting Director Anna Gussarova spoke at a cyber domain workshop on “International Cooperation in

Read more

Security Along the Silk Road (New Delhi)

On 15-16 December 2016 CAISS Acting Director Anna Gussarova and Deputy Director Yevgeniy Khon participated in a two-day conference entitled

Read more