CAES: Institutional Versus State Interests

The purpose of the policy brief is to examine whether these institutions possess powerful instruments to encourage/force member states to ensure stability and reliability of energy supplies within the region (institutional interests) even by sacrificing some of their political, economic or other gains (state interests).

“Security of the Central Asian Energy System: Institutional Versus State Interests,” Farkhod Aminjonov

The CAES, a complex network of pipelines, electric power grids and energy/power producing facilities, was designed irrespective of national borders and turned the region’s energy sectors into highly interdependent entities of the system. The resource sharing mechanism ensured security of the CAES—a condition in which all states enjoyed reliable and stable energy supplies simultaneously. The security of the CAES was ensured through intra-regional cooperation regulated by supranational administrative bodies. Over the past decade, however, Central Asian governments, without yet establishing self-sufficient national energy systems, have been pursuing energy policies, which stress self–reliance and self–control. As a result, intra-Central Asian energy trade was compromised thus affecting the short- and medium-term availability of gas and thermal electricity to upstream and hydroelectricity supplies to downstream countries. The policy brief explores potential collective benefits of, and major challenges for newly established regional energy governing mechanisms to, improving security of the CAES within such institutions as (a) the Eurasian Economic Union (EaEU), (b) the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), and (c) the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The purpose of the policy brief is to examine whether these institutions possess powerful instruments to encourage/force member states to ensure stability and reliability of energy supplies within the region (institutional interests) even by sacrificing some of their political, economic or other gains (state interests).

Link to the article: http://www.osce-academy.net/upload/file/Brief32.pdf

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